Photograph Submission

Kramer Drive

Please upload your original photo as a JPEG with a minimum Resolution of 300 DPI at 4” x 6”. For digital cameras, the Quality Setting should be set at 7 or higher. Please be sure that the photo size is larger than the final printed photo area on the card to allow for placement and possible cropping. If you have any special requests regarding Image Cropping, please provide this information to us in “Special Instructions.”


For no additional charge, Kramer Drive can convert a full color photo to black & white or sepia tone upon request. Unless specified in “Special Instructions,” your photo will be printed on the card in the Color Format it was uploaded to finestationery.com. Depending on the nature of your photo and the type of paper used, printed photos may have color variations from the original digital file.


TIP: Please consider how your image orientation corresponds to the overall card orientation. A vertical photo will look best in a vertical layout and a horizontal photo will be best suited for a horizontal layout.


PLEASE NOTE: Photos taken by professional photographers require consent before printing. Upon submission of your order, you represent to FineStationery.com that you either own the image or that you have permission from the copyright holder.


Photo Glossary Terms:

Image Cropping

Cropping is a technique graphic designers and typesetters use to cut or trim unneeded portions of an image. This may involve removing some of the image from the left, right, top or bottom. Cropping can also mean highlighting a small rectangular section of the image to create a focal point, while removing the rest of the image.

Resolution

The term resolution has many different definitions. In terms of photo printing, resolution refers to the detail involved printing an image. High resolution images are generally 300 DPI or higher, and provide excellent image detail. Low resolution images, or images with a low DPI, tend to have less detail and may sometimes appear blurry or distorted when printed. The best way to ensure that your image will be high resolution is to use a camera with 3 or more megapixels and to set it at the highest quality setting available.

Color Format

Color format is a term used to describe the state of the picture when it was uploaded to the FineStationery.com web site. The image could be uploaded in the following states: full color, black & white, sepia tone, etc.

EPS

An EPS is a digital file format. It can obtain any combination of text, images and graphics, and is easy to transfer between Macs and PCs. A few of our vendors accept EPS files for photo cards. However, the most popular formats are JPEG and TIF. You can check your file format simply by looking at the file name. You will know your file is an EPS if the file name ends in .eps.

PSD

A PSD is the native file format for Adobe Photoshop. You will only be able to open or view this kind of image with Adobe Photoshop or another image editing program. A few of our vendors accept PSD files for photo cards. However, the most popular formats are JPEG and TIF. You can check your file format simply by looking at the file name. You will know your file is a PSD if the file name ends in .psd.

PDF

A PDF is a document file that can be read with Adobe Acrobat Reader Software. A few of our vendors will accept photos as a PDF file, however, the most popular photo file formats are JPEG and TIF. You will know your file is a PDF if the file name ends in .pdf.

Megabytes

A unit for measuring the data storage size of an image file. One megabyte is equal to 1 million bytes. A few of our photo card vendors place limitations on the number of megabytes, or overall size of the image file you submit. This is to prevent difficulties in sending and receiving the file. To check the size of your image on a PC, simply right click the image and select properties. The number designated as the “size on disk” is the number that you should be referencing for the overall number of bytes. To check the size of your image on a Mac, click on the image file and hold down the command, apple and I keys. This will bring up an info palette which will show the size.

JPEG

A JPEG (pronounced jay-peg) is a digital file format that compresses an image. The smallest file size can be sent by e-mail, and is suitable for small photo prints. Larger prints, however, should generally be saved at a higher resolution for image quality purposes. You will know your file is a JPEG if the file name ends in .jpg.

Quality Setting

The camera quality setting determines how many pixels are captured in an image. You should always have your camera set to the highest quality setting available. Read your camera’s manual to learn how to adjust this setting.

TIF

The TIF file format is one of the most common graphic image formats. You will know your file is formatted as a TIF if the file name ends in .tif.

DPI

DPI is a measure of printing resolution that stands for Dots-per-inch, or the number of ink dots that make up a printed image. Low DPI can result in photos that look blurry and distorted. In general, an image with a high DPI, or more dots, will be sharper and of better quality. The best way to ensure that your image will have enough DPI to print a high-quality photo is to use a camera with 3 or more megapixels and to set it at the highest quality setting available. To determine how many megapixels your camera has, and to learn more about quality settings, please refer to your camera owner’s manual.

Megapixel

A megapixel is equal to 1 million pixels. Pixels are dots that make up an image. In general, the greater the pixel count of an image, the higher print-quality that image will produce. Most 3 megapixel cameras can produce an image to print a high-quality 4 x 6 inch photo. To find out how many megapixels your camera has, please reference your camera manual.

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